Understanding Workers’ Compensation Ratings

What is a workers' compensation insurance rating and what does it mean? Once you have initiated a workers' compensation claim, you will meet with a medical provider who will evaluate and provide treatment for your injury. Eventually, the medical provider will provide the insurance company with a rating for your injury. The insurance company handling your claim will use this rating as a basis for compensating you for your injury.

At Loney & Schueller, LLC, we are strong advocates for injured workers' throughout Iowa. When you retain our firm, you will work personally with an attorney who will guide you through the workers' compensation process and make sure you understand your rights. Our goal is to ease your mind while maximizing your monetary compensation. Before accepting a settlement from an insurer, it is important to understand how the workers' compensation rating system works.

What Is A Workers' Compensation Rating?

Workers' compensation ratings are based on the impairment or loss of use of a particular part of the body. The rating is based on the difference between how the person could function without the impairment and with the impairment.

Ratings are not assigned at a first visit. Ratings are assigned by an insurance company's medical provider after you have undergone rehabilitation and have achieved maximum medical improvement. Maximum medical improvement represents the point at which the insurance company's physician determines no further improvement is likely within a year's time. Depending on your rating, you may be entitled to permanently partial disability or permanent total disability.

What The Workers' Compensation Insurer Does Not Want You To Know

An insurer may present you with an initial settlement offer, telling you this is the only compensation you are entitled to receive. This is not true. What the insurer initially presents is the minimum amount you are owed under law. You may be entitled to significantly more.

Wondering If Your Rating Is Accurate? Talk To A Lawyer Today

What if your rating does not reflect the full extent of your injuries. You have the option of obtaining a second opinion. Under Iowa law, workers' compensation insurers must cover the cost of secondary medical examination if requested.

There are many things an insurer may not be telling you about your claim. Make sure you have someone on your side who will stand up for your rights. Schedule a free initial appointment with Loney & Schueller, LLC today. In Des Moines, call 515-505-3013 or in greater Iowa call toll free at 888-857-9266. We represent injured workers throughout the state. You can also reach us online.